Ear Pic of the Week

This week the CellScope team selected a Pic taken with the CellScope Oto by Chicago Pediatrician Dr. Dan Weissbluth.

Image taken by Dr. Dan Weissbluth with the CellScope Oto

Image taken by Dr. Dan Weissbluth with the CellScope Oto

Dr. Weissbluth explained that the image was taken from the left ear of a 3 year-old child who previously had myringotomy tubes surgically placed in both ears.

The patient showed up in the Chicago office with complaints of new drainage and some pain.  Dr. Weissbluth was able to save the images taken with the Oto and send them to the referred ENT. Antibiotic ear drops were prescribed and the child is now improving.

Check out our previous Ear Pics of the Week.

An Ear Canal, Pretty in Pink

If you thought the image below was too-pink-to-be-normal, you are right!

San Francisco Pediatric ENT Dr. Terri Kim, captured a PINK silicone earplug stuck in a patients ear canal with her CellScope Oto.

Dr. Terri Kim captures a pink silicon earplug in the ear canal of a patient. Picture taken with the CellScope Oto.

Dr. Terri Kim captures a pink silicon earplug in the ear canal of a patient. Picture taken with the CellScope Oto.

She states that the patient thinks they rubbed their ear during sleep and ended up pushing it into the ear canal. When they tried to remove it, they ended up pushing it in more.

By the time they saw Dr. Kim saw the patient, the silicon plug had softened because it’d been in there so long. She confirmed that the foreign body was easily and completely removed from the canal.

Ear Pic of the Week – Cholesteatoma

Dr. Eloy Villasuso, Otolaryngologist at Cleveland Clinic Florida, provided us with an great image of a Cholesteatoma that we wanted to share!

Right ear with Cholesteastoma captured by Dr. Villasuso with his CellScope Oto

Right ear with Cholesteastoma captured by Dr. Villasuso with his CellScope Oto

Cholesteatoma is an uncommon condition where a cyst-like growth develops in the ear. It can be a congenital problem but most commonly occurs as a complication of chronic ear infection.

As Dr Villasuso explains, “This patient had right ear pain for the last several months with decreased hearing. When he presented to the clinic a large amount of cerumen and squamous debris was removed from his right ear canal revealing the defect seen in the picture. The picture shows a large tympanic membrane perforation eroding the scutum with cholesteatoma outlining the head of the malleus and no visible incus. The inferior portion of tympanic membrane was otherwise normal.”

Surgery is usually advised to remove the cholesteatoma and prevent further damage, including hearing loss. This patient underwent a tympanoplasty and mastoidectomy for removal of the extensive cholesteatoma and will be monitored regularly.

Fear the Fireworks, For your Ears’ Sake!

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) recently issued its annual report of deaths and injuries involving legal and illegal fireworks for 2012. Fireworks can have a life-altering impact on consumers, including severe eye injuries, loss of limbs, hearing loss and even death.

Between June 22, 2012 and July 22, 2012, more than 5,000 consumers were treated in hospital emergency rooms due to fireworks-related injuries. The majority of those injuries occurred on or around the July 4th holiday.  An estimated 19% of these injuries were to the head, face or ears.

In these cases, injury to the ears can often cause a rupture of the tympanic membrane. Dr. Kenneth Deem of Tacoma, Washington sent in these images he captured with the CellScope Oto one week after a firework blast near the face of the patient.

Left ear of patient with Tympanic Membrane perforation due to firework explosion near face. Captured by Dr. Kenneth Deem with the CellScope Oto.

Left ear of patient with Tympanic Membrane perforation due to firework explosion near face. Captured by Dr. Kenneth Deem with the CellScope Oto.

Right ear of patient with Tympanic Membrane perforation due to firework explosion near face. Captured by Dr. Kenneth Deem with the CellScope Oto.

Right ear of patient with Tympanic Membrane perforation due to firework explosion near face. Captured by Dr. Kenneth Deem with the CellScope Oto.

The 47 year old man had a “large bottle rocket” exploded near his face. He had a mixed hearing loss in both ears with a 10-20 decibel conductive hearing loss, Deem says.

In CPSC’s report, about 1,000 reported injuries involved sparklers and bottle rockets, fireworks that are frequently and incorrectly considered safe for young children. According to the above mentioned report, 30% of fireworks injuries happened to children under 15 years of age.  So, keep your children , yourself and your ears safe by avoiding fireworks.

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Ear Pic of the Week – A Picture Perfect Tympanic Membrane Perforation

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This week’s scope of the week was taken with a CellScope Oto at Hossein Hassani’s Santa Cruz, CA office.  Dr. Hassani specializes in family medicine and told us that this image was obtained from a patient who returned for a follow up visit after a diagnosis of otitis media. The patients infection symptoms improved, however he experienced a change in pressure, and complained of his ear being plugged. In the upper left of the image, there is a small perforation of the tympanic membrane. He goes on to explain that tears of this size typically heal on their own and do not require surgical repair.

Thank you Dr. Hassani for sharing your image!

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Ear Pic of the Week

This week Dr. Kahn captured the right ear of a 5-year-old with Serous Otitis Media with his CellScope Oto. He points out that you can clearly see a bubble of fluid behind the tympanic membrane. The patient is being treated medically and if the fluid persists, the patient will be a candidate for myringotomy and tube placement surgery.

CellScope OME image

Serous Otitis Media

Dr. Kahn is the Associate Chief Head and Neck Surgery at Kaiser in Walnut Creek California.

New OHNS Ear Tube Guidelines Mean Time for a Swim!

This week The Acadamy of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery released new clinical guidelines for use and car of tympanostomy tubes in children.  According to the OHNS, by age 3, nearly 1 in 15 children in the US have tubes. The surgical placement in the eardrum to treat persistent middle ear fluid (effusion), frequent ear infections, or ear infections that persist despite antibiotic therapy is the leading reason outpatient surgery for the country’s younger population (ages 1 – 12).

The July 1st guidelines say that children with repeated ear infections don’t always need tubes.  They say tubes should not be considered in children who have had fluid in the ears for less than three months. Often fluid build-up the persists after an ear infection can go away on it’s own. The CellScope team’s intepretation of that? They will instead need great follow up and monitoring. Perhaps with a smartphone otoscope.

Tympanostomy Tube Placement Image

Tube placement captured by the CellScope Oto

CellScope Oto Tube Placement

Tympanostomy Tube Placement captured with the CellScope Oto

And kids who already have tubes? Well, the guidelines say they don’t need to avoid getting water in their ears. Swimming and splashing are fair game!